Geek girl who loves the Sounders, comics, volunteering and works at the world's largest internet retailer. [E], ECCC Minion, GGC Special Agent

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Uncanny Brett White with 9,137 notes

uncannybrettwhite:

MARVEL. YES.

Source: themyskira

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from Green Bananas with 17,022 notes

rhapsody-tardisblue:

pallet-town-julie-brown:

blackgirlsinked:

Esther Jones, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was a singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at The Cotton Club in Harlem. Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and appropriated Jones’ ‘baby’ singing style for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Jones’ style went on to become the inspiration for the voice of Betty Boop.(What I Looked up)

this is why i just think people of color created and were behind everything ever. No matter what it is, it comes back to a person of color being behind it, and real talk 70% of the time its a black person or African civilization

shit. I didn’t know they stole her whole look too

rhapsody-tardisblue:

pallet-town-julie-brown:

blackgirlsinked:

Esther Jones, known by her stage name, “Baby Esther,” was a singer and entertainer of the late 1920s. She performed regularly at The Cotton Club in Harlem. Helen Kane saw her act in 1928 and appropriated Jones’ ‘baby’ singing style for a recording of “I Wanna Be Loved By You.” Jones’ style went on to become the inspiration for the voice of Betty Boop.(What I Looked up)

this is why i just think people of color created and were behind everything ever. No matter what it is, it comes back to a person of color being behind it, and real talk 70% of the time its a black person or African civilization

shit. I didn’t know they stole her whole look too

Tagged: representation

Source: blackgirlsinked

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Green Bananas with 12,977 notes

yoursunandstars:

Hearing Aid Ear Plugs Concept by designaffairs

Rising self-confidence is taking prostheses to another level. People don’t try to hide their handicap anymore.Show what you‘ve got, don’t make a fuzz about your problem. Wear your hearing aid like a piece of jewelry, a stylish accessory. Be individual, be cool, be yourself.

Hearing aid is made for customers with a medium level of hearing disability. In case of a severe hearing damage one could order the PLUG which contents a more powerful system.

COURTNEY, THE PERFECT REASON FOR ME TO GET PLUGS XD

Source: guttur

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Emerald City Comicon with 34 notes

emeraldcitycomicon:

Our newest celebrity guest is Julie Benz! Currently starring as Amanda Rosewater in the SyFy hit Defiance, she has been a fan-favorite ever since playing Darla on Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Angel. She’s starred in the Punisher, Saw, and Rambo franchises, played a superhero in the ABC series No Ordinary Family, and was Dexter’s better half, Rita.

Ms. Benz will be at ECCC all three days, she will be available for photo ops, autograph sessions, and panels.

Tagged: ECCCECCC 2015Julie Benz

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Sign contract, become magical. with 1,418 notes

theomeganerd:

Dragon Age II - Flemeth cosplay

by MonoAbel

Tagged: FlemethDragon Agecosplay

Source: monoabel.deviantart.com

2nd September 2014

Link reblogged from SEEMED LIKE A GOOD IDEA AT THE TIME with 18 notes

Back Side of Summer →

jenvanmeter:

I’ve been almost entirely absent from social media for about six weeks. A loss in the family, the kids’ summer schedules, and a handful of other things conspired in such a way that Tumblr and Twitter were things I had to set down pretty much entirely. It needed to be done, but I’ve missed the…

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from APE IN A CAPE with 781 notes

gailsimone:

This is the movie I watch at least five times a year.

Tagged: lilo and stitch

Source: sheerdisneymagic

2nd September 2014

Photo reblogged from APE IN A CAPE with 4,875 notes

gailsimone:

greg-pak:

Gene Yang is one of my heroes. Read this, y’all.
weneeddiversebooks:

Read This: Gene Luen Yang’s rousing comics speech at the 2014 National Book Festival gala
From the Washington Post, article here.
GENE LUEN YANG, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building:
Good evening. Thank you, Library of Congress and National Book Festival, for inviting me to share the stage with such esteemed authors, and to speak with all of you. I am deeply grateful for this honor.
I’m a comic-book guy, so tonight I’d like to talk about another comic book guy. Dwayne McDuffie was one of my favorite writers. When I was growing up, he was one of the few African-Americans working in American comics. Dwayne worked primarily within the superhero genre. He got his start at Marvel Comics but eventually worked for almost every comic book publisher out there. He even branched out into television and wrote for popular cartoon series like “Justice League” and “Ben 10.”
Dwayne McDuffie
Dwayne McDuffie is no longer with us, unfortunately. He passed away in 2011, at the age of 49. But within comics, his influence is still deeply felt.
I was lucky enough to have met him once. About a year before his death, we were on a panel together at Comic-Con. I had the opportunity to shake his hand and tell him how much his work meant to me.
In a column Dwayne wrote in 1999, he talked about his love of the Black Panther, a Marvel Comics character. The Black Panther’s secret alias is T’Challa, the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. He has super senses, super strength, and super agility. He’s an Avenger, though he hasn’t yet made it into the movies.
The Black Panther wasn’t created by African American cartoonists. He was created in July of 1966 by two Jewish Americans, Stan Lee (who was born Stanley Lieber) and Jack Kirby (who was born Jacob Kurtzberg).
By modern standards, the Black Panther is not a flawless example of a black superhero. In their first draft of the character, Lee and Kirby called him “the Coal Tiger” and gave him a goofy yellow and black costume. Even in his final form, his superhero alias includes the word “Black.” This is true of many early African and African American superheroes, as if what makes them remarkable is neither their superpowers nor their heroism, but their ethnicity. Most problematic, though, was that Marvel made their most prominent black superhero the star of a series called Jungle Action.
All of these flaws were lost on Dwayne McDuffie when he first encountered the Black Panther in 1973, at the age of 11. What struck him was the character’s commanding sense of dignity. The Black Panther wasn’t anyone’s sidekick. He wasn’t an angry thug. He wasn’t a victim. He was his own hero, his own man. As Dwayne describes it, “In the space of 15 pages, black people moved from invisible to inevitable.”
Dwayne’s love of the Black Panther eventually blossomed into a love of comics in general. Dwayne was a smart guy with a lot of options in life. He’d earned a master’s degree in physics. But he chose to write comics as his career. I would argue that without the Black Panther, this flawed black character created by a writer and an artist who were not black, there would be no Dwayne McDuffie the comic book writer.
Dwayne wasn’t just a writer — he was also a businessman. In the early ’90s, he teamed with a group of writers and artists to found Milestone Media, the most prominent minority-owned comic book company that has ever existed. The Milestone universe have since been folded into DC Comics, so these days characters like Static Shock and Icon – characters Dwayne co-created – fight crime alongside Superman and Batman.
In the early ’90s, I was finishing up my adolescence. I visited my local comic-book store on a weekly basis, and one week I found a book on the stands called Xombi, published by Milestone Media. Xombi is a scientist who became a superhero after he was injected with nanotechnology. He allied himself with a secret order of superpowered nuns. One sister was known as Nun of the Above, another Nun the Less. Together, they protected the world from all kinds of supernatural threats.
Xombi was inventive and fun, but he stood out to me because he was an Asian American male carrying in his own monthly title. And even more notable – he didn’t know Kung Fu. Xombi wasn’t created by Asian Americans – his writer was white and his artist black – but he did make Asian Americans a little less invisible.
We in the book community are in the middle of a sustained conversation about diversity. We talk about our need for diverse books with diverse characters written by diverse writers. I wholeheartedly agree.
But I have noticed an undercurrent of fear in many of our discussions. We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.
This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities. After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.
I told you the story of Dwayne McDuffie to encourage all of us to be generous with ourselves and with one another. The Black Panther, despite his flaws, was able to inspire a young African American reader to become a writer.
We have to allow ourselves the freedom to make mistakes, including cultural mistakes, in our first drafts. I believe it’s okay to get cultural details wrong in your first draft. It’s okay if stereotypes emerge. It just means that your experience is limited, that you’re human.
Just make sure you iron them out before the final draft. Make sure you do your homework. Make sure your early readers include people who are a part of the culture you’re writing about. Make sure your editor has the insider knowledge to help you out. If they don’t, consider hiring a freelance editor who does.
Also, it’s okay if stereotypes emerge in the first drafts of your colleagues. Correct them – definitely correct them – but do so in a spirit of generosity. Remember how soul-wrenching the act of writing is, how much courage it took for that writer to put words down on a page.
And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.
Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.


Two of the all-time best. 

gailsimone:

greg-pak:

Gene Yang is one of my heroes. Read this, y’all.

weneeddiversebooks:

Read This: Gene Luen Yang’s rousing comics speech at the 2014 National Book Festival gala

From the Washington Post, article here.

GENE LUEN YANG, Library of Congress, Jefferson Building:

Good evening. Thank you, Library of Congress and National Book Festival, for inviting me to share the stage with such esteemed authors, and to speak with all of you. I am deeply grateful for this honor.

I’m a comic-book guy, so tonight I’d like to talk about another comic book guy. Dwayne McDuffie was one of my favorite writers. When I was growing up, he was one of the few African-Americans working in American comics. Dwayne worked primarily within the superhero genre. He got his start at Marvel Comics but eventually worked for almost every comic book publisher out there. He even branched out into television and wrote for popular cartoon series like “Justice League” and “Ben 10.”

Dwayne McDuffie is no longer with us, unfortunately. He passed away in 2011, at the age of 49. But within comics, his influence is still deeply felt.

I was lucky enough to have met him once. About a year before his death, we were on a panel together at Comic-Con. I had the opportunity to shake his hand and tell him how much his work meant to me.

In a column Dwayne wrote in 1999, he talked about his love of the Black Panther, a Marvel Comics character. The Black Panther’s secret alias is T’Challa, the king of the fictional African nation of Wakanda. He has super senses, super strength, and super agility. He’s an Avenger, though he hasn’t yet made it into the movies.

The Black Panther wasn’t created by African American cartoonists. He was created in July of 1966 by two Jewish Americans, Stan Lee (who was born Stanley Lieber) and Jack Kirby (who was born Jacob Kurtzberg).

By modern standards, the Black Panther is not a flawless example of a black superhero. In their first draft of the character, Lee and Kirby called him “the Coal Tiger” and gave him a goofy yellow and black costume. Even in his final form, his superhero alias includes the word “Black.” This is true of many early African and African American superheroes, as if what makes them remarkable is neither their superpowers nor their heroism, but their ethnicity. Most problematic, though, was that Marvel made their most prominent black superhero the star of a series called Jungle Action.

All of these flaws were lost on Dwayne McDuffie when he first encountered the Black Panther in 1973, at the age of 11. What struck him was the character’s commanding sense of dignity. The Black Panther wasn’t anyone’s sidekick. He wasn’t an angry thug. He wasn’t a victim. He was his own hero, his own man. As Dwayne describes it, “In the space of 15 pages, black people moved from invisible to inevitable.”

Dwayne’s love of the Black Panther eventually blossomed into a love of comics in general. Dwayne was a smart guy with a lot of options in life. He’d earned a master’s degree in physics. But he chose to write comics as his career. I would argue that without the Black Panther, this flawed black character created by a writer and an artist who were not black, there would be no Dwayne McDuffie the comic book writer.

Dwayne wasn’t just a writer — he was also a businessman. In the early ’90s, he teamed with a group of writers and artists to found Milestone Media, the most prominent minority-owned comic book company that has ever existed. The Milestone universe have since been folded into DC Comics, so these days characters like Static Shock and Icon – characters Dwayne co-created – fight crime alongside Superman and Batman.

In the early ’90s, I was finishing up my adolescence. I visited my local comic-book store on a weekly basis, and one week I found a book on the stands called Xombi, published by Milestone Media. Xombi is a scientist who became a superhero after he was injected with nanotechnology. He allied himself with a secret order of superpowered nuns. One sister was known as Nun of the Above, another Nun the Less. Together, they protected the world from all kinds of supernatural threats.

Xombi was inventive and fun, but he stood out to me because he was an Asian American male carrying in his own monthly title. And even more notable – he didn’t know Kung Fu. Xombi wasn’t created by Asian Americans – his writer was white and his artist black – but he did make Asian Americans a little less invisible.

We in the book community are in the middle of a sustained conversation about diversity. We talk about our need for diverse books with diverse characters written by diverse writers. I wholeheartedly agree.

But I have noticed an undercurrent of fear in many of our discussions. We’re afraid of writing characters different from ourselves because we’re afraid of getting it wrong. We’re afraid of what the Internet might say.

This fear can be a good thing if it drives us to do our homework, to be meticulous in our cultural research. But this fear crosses the line when we become so intimidated that we quietly make choices against stepping out of our own identities.
After all, our job as writers is to step out of ourselves, and to encourage our readers to do the same.

I told you the story of Dwayne McDuffie to encourage all of us to be generous with ourselves and with one another. The Black Panther, despite his flaws, was able to inspire a young African American reader to become a writer.

We have to allow ourselves the freedom to make mistakes, including cultural mistakes, in our first drafts. I believe it’s okay to get cultural details wrong in your first draft. It’s okay if stereotypes emerge. It just means that your experience is limited, that you’re human.

Just make sure you iron them out before the final draft. Make sure you do your homework. Make sure your early readers include people who are a part of the culture you’re writing about. Make sure your editor has the insider knowledge to help you out. If they don’t, consider hiring a freelance editor who does.

Also, it’s okay if stereotypes emerge in the first drafts of your colleagues. Correct them – definitely correct them – but do so in a spirit of generosity. Remember how soul-wrenching the act of writing is, how much courage it took for that writer to put words down on a page.

And let’s say you do your best. You put in all the effort you can. But then when your book comes out, the Internet gets angry. You slowly realize that, for once, the Internet might be right. You made a cultural misstep. If this happens, take comfort in the fact that even flawed characters can inspire. Apologize if necessary, resolve do better, and move on.

Let your fear drive you to do your homework. But no matter what, don’t ever let your fear stop you.

Two of the all-time best. 

Tagged: Dwayne McDuffiecomicsrepresentation

Source: weneeddiversebooks

2nd September 2014

Link with 2 notes

The End of Gatekeeping: The Extinction Burst of Gaming Culture - Paging Dr. NerdLove →

"While the increased visibility of women in geek culture can be traced back to the mid-90s with the American broadcasts of Sailor Moon and Pokémon, women haven’t just been in geek culture since the beginning, they were the beginning. The first novel ever was The Tale of Genjiby Murasaki Shikibu. Mary Shelly single-handedly invented the science-fiction genre withFrankenstein, while the first “masked hero” was the Scarlet Pimpernel, created by Emma Orczy. Ada Lovelace was one of the first programmers ever while – bringing it back to gaming – Roberta Williams created the graphical adventure game with Mystery Manor. “

Tagged: responsible geekeryfeminismgatekeepingDr. Nerdlove

2nd September 2014

Photoset reblogged from Semper Ad Meliora with 7,017 notes

worldoflis:

girldwarf:

Deconstructing Masculinity & Manhood with Michael Kimmel @ Dartmouth College

YAAAAEEESSSSSSS

You know what I like, and feel is so important? That he doesn’t say “Men thinks those are THEIR positions”. He says “We think those are OUR positions.”

As a male feminist, he still doesn’t exclude himself from the group of men.

Tagged: feminismprivilege

Source: exgynocraticgrrl